Archive for April, 2010

Rod Palm’s ship house on Strawberry Isle in Tofino, BC

Sunday, April 25th, 2010

Views of Rod’s famous ship house just off Tofino on the West Coat of Vancouver Island. Below, from here. And on Rod Palm and the Strawberry Isle Research Society here.

Ships at a distance have every man’s wish on board

Saturday, April 24th, 2010

Ships at a distance have every man’s wish on board. For some they come in with the tide. For others they sail forever on the horizon, never out of sight, never landing until the Watcher turns his eyes away in resignation, his dreams mocked to death by Time. That is the life of men. Now, women forget all those things they don’t want to remember, and remember everything they don’t want …read more

Door canopy by architect Robert Kleyn

Thursday, April 22nd, 2010

Beautiful canopy by Robert Kleyn for Catriona Jeffries Gallery, Vancouver. The design of this canopy is clever not just because it’s a visually interesting addition to an otherwise aggressively plain warehouse, but also because it effectively deflects wind in what is an exposed windy laneway. And it has worn very well – it’s been up there for a while now. Kleyn, who converted this warehouse building to a gallery for …read more

“I’m afraid your novel is unsuitable for us at the present time.”

Wednesday, April 21st, 2010

From Black Books, Irish comedian Dylan Moran’s British TV series. Moran played Bernard Black, misanthropic second-hand bookshop owner. See also another episode in which Bernard, unable to figure out his tax forms, learns that he will receive an extension for filing his return only in the event of injury, so seeks injury by provoking skinheads. Also see his standup routines – eg. on the French, on accents, and on stereotyping of the Irish.

Rain chains or kusari toi

Wednesday, April 21st, 2010

Kusari toi (sometimes translitered “doi”)—the Japanese characters are 鎖樋 which translates literally as “chain gutters”—are known in English as rain chains. They are used in Japan as downspouts to direct rain from a gutter to the ground, where it either flows into a gravel or pebble bed or into some sort of catchment. Rain chains are traditional on Japanese houses and temples, but they’re also sometimes seen on midcentury modern …read more

“If I Had a Hammer? What Do You Mean If?”

Monday, April 19th, 2010

Before I start, I’m asking on behalf of the owners of this house that nobody reposts or reproduces any of these images anywhere without my permission. Like a lot of people who have built their own houses in the woods, the owners, who are relatives of mine, appreciate their privacy and feel a bit negative about seeing their house all over the internet. Despite misgivings, they did say yes to …read more