Archive for December, 2011

Happy New Year

Saturday, December 31st, 2011

Happy 2012 from Arizona, where I am experiencing a family holiday in the desert.

What is happening in this picture? Party or headache?

[Can someone please explain why they do this to the cacti? It seems to have a function. Beyond entertainment.]

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Best decoration of the 2011 holiday season – Xmas tree of books at Vancouver Art Gallery

Thursday, December 29th, 2011

“Xmas greadings,” via Michael Turner’s site websit. It’s Vancouver Art Gallery librarian Cheryl Siegel’s annual Xmas tree.

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Most confusing Christmas decoration of the 2011 season

Monday, December 26th, 2011

Please take a number and ponder how The Nutcracker—you remember, that’s the story of a seven-headed Mouse King and a kingdom of dolls who come magically alive, among other pagan details—is actually a Christian-run story secretly enacted by a Jesus-like white Santa Claus operating marionettes hung from gold crosses.

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Oldest known Neanderthal house found in Ukraine – made from woolly mammoth bones

Thursday, December 22nd, 2011

Why do discoveries of ancient houses make me so happy? A 44,000 year old Neanderthal bone house has been found near Moldova in Eastern Ukraine. It’s a nearly circular structure made from woolly mammoth bone, and it’s 26 feet wide at its widest point – that’s pretty substantial, the same width as the little church I live in.

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NYC haiku traffic signs

Saturday, December 17th, 2011

New York City’s Dept of Transportation commissioned artist James Morse to produce these lateral, funny, thought-provoking haiku signs. They are designed to alert pedestrians, cyclists and drivers to the unexpected on the road. Beautiful, genius, and amusing. Morse was already known for his guerrilla haikus installed in urban public space. Can’t believe he’s called Morse.

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Aalto chair

Saturday, December 17th, 2011

Most people think of eco-compatibility in terms of recycling. But even with recycling, the earth’s resources aren’t nearly sufficient to allow the bulk of the planet’s population to consume at the levels we do in the developed world. If we are ever to allow the entire population to reach our standard of living, we have to learn to make do with less.

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