Posts Tagged ‘70s’

Secos & Molhados – Sangue Latino

Thursday, February 6th, 2014

Oh 1973, I am so happy to see you yet again. Last week it was Sensations Fix, and then yesterday someone posted Sangue Latino by Secos & Molhados. I hadn’t heard it in years. Brazil does glam folk rock. So very beautiful.

Transformer

Monday, October 28th, 2013

Dancing to Transformer inside the old Crying Room space a few weeks ago, oblivious and laughing at 4 am while singing along to: And curtains laced with diamonds dear for you And all the Roman Noblemen for you And kingdom’s Christian Soldiers dear for you And melting ice cap mountain tops for you And knights in flaming silver robes for you And bats that with a kiss turn prince for …read more

Stainless steel, white, avocado, harvest gold, bellbottoms, Vietnam, Iraq

Thursday, November 22nd, 2012

An article on fashions in appliance colours (stainless steel vs. white) on oveninfo.com (a kitchen appliance website) quickly leads to a flame war in its comment section.  Stainless steel is pitted against avocado and harvest gold, bellbottoms against video games and Vietnam vs. Iraq. When I was saying aesthetics are the thin end of the wedge of politics I wasn’t expecting the road to be quite this short.

Stereo systems and speakers, 1960s & 70s style

Wednesday, October 24th, 2012

Why don’t we do this kind of thing anymore? You saw it a lot in the 1960s and 70s—speakers embedded in display shelves or on a wall, as part of the decor. Maybe it’s partly that components were better looking then, in general, but you could still do this now. Why don’t we? Is it because stereo components are now considered throwaway, and you’d never make built-ins because your components …read more

Arcosanti, by Paolo Soleri

Thursday, January 5th, 2012

Arcosanti, designed by Italian-born architect Paolo Soleri, is an experimental architectural complex perched on the side of a gulch in the Arizona desert, about 70 miles north of Phoenix. Arcosanti was begun in 1970 as a multi-stage project, but it is not—and perhaps may never be—finished. Ultimately meant to house 5000, it currently houses far fewer but nevertheless still exists as a proposition for a new hyper-dense, ecologically sensitive mode of human settlement. …read more

Rocking camel by B.C. painter/author Jim Willer

Friday, July 15th, 2011

I grew up with this psychedelic rocking camel, handmade in the late 60s/early 70s by B.C. artist/novelist Jim Willer. He called these “Bumpity Camels” and ours was one of a series—our cousins had one too. When we were kids it used to have a blue wooden knocker on a wire that hung inside and clip-clopped when you rocked (even though camels are silent), but the noise drove us crazy so …read more