Posts Tagged ‘concrete’

Brutalist Vancouver building that hasn’t dated

Sunday, May 27th, 2012


(Thanks to Steven Ballegeer for this photo on Flickr)

Just to prove I don’t hate all tall buildings, this early 1970s brutalist concrete highrise in Vancouver is a long-time favourite of mine, and one that I think has held up really well over the years. It’s known as the 805 Broadway Medical Dental Centre or the Frank Stanzl building.

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Arcosanti, by Paolo Soleri

Thursday, January 5th, 2012

Arcosanti, designed by Italian-born architect Paolo Soleri, is an experimental architectural complex perched on the side of a gulch in the Arizona desert, about 70 miles north of Phoenix. Arcosanti was begun in 1970 as a multi-stage project, but it is not—and perhaps may never be—finished.

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Concrete planters. What happened? Whither minimalism? Whither design?

Friday, April 1st, 2011

Whatever happened to planters like these two? They may still be in production, but wherever they are still available, and that’s nearly nowhere, they’re civic-sized, weigh 500-1000 pounds, and are out of scale for people’s home gardens. Why? Whither modernism for domestic landscaping? After a golden age of simple, sophisticated design in the 60s and 70s, the commercial design industry is taking us in the direction of cheapness, ornateness, bad nostalgia and the whole philosophy that goes with it.

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Coast guard tower, Cuba

Monday, January 3rd, 2011

Just off the Playa Ancon outside the town of Trinidad, Cuba.

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Empty bank building, Charleston SC

Monday, November 22nd, 2010

For brutalist concrete, I find this little bank quite friendly. And not half bad for a drive-in. Unfortunately it seems to be abandoned. Photo above is by agilitynut, and and an alternate view is here. She writes “This Bank of America was built in 1974 and first occupied by Bankers Trust.

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Parking garage, Mexico City

Wednesday, May 19th, 2010

Just a cement parking garage, but look how much care has been taken with the design of the concrete forms used for this building, and also with the lettering. Though clearly someone felt the subtle sign was a little too subtle for business.

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