Posts Tagged ‘conversation pit’

inside

Wednesday, July 1st, 2009

Photos via inside (photo above is at insideinside.tumblr.com), one of the best curated tumblelogs on tumblr. Well-named, also. And see its sister site, outside, which is equally good. My apologies for not knowing the name of the photographers, owners or designers behind these photos. It’s tumblr, so all bets are off. It’s a zone of 100% copyright infringement and rampant decontextualization. I feel a little funny reposting anything I find there, for …read more

Whatever happened to the seating platform, the conversation pit?

Tuesday, June 23rd, 2009

Above, the 1970s modern two-level platform in painter Frank Stella’s loft, from the classic book Inside Today’s Home. Below, a recent photo of the renovated 1950s conversation pit in the Number 31 Hotel in Dublin. Maybe it’s because I grew up around a hip artist aunt whose 60s/70s handmade house had a seating platform in it, but I am mourning the disappearance of the freeform seating arrangement. And apparently I am not alone. …read more

Geodesic dome redux

Thursday, May 28th, 2009

This post is sort of a follow-up to a previous post with a similar thesis: that the 60s and 70s aren’t dead, they’re alive and well and living on tumblr. These photos of geodesic dome interiors and exteriors are just a small selection from randomfriendly,  nomadicway, julesandnicho, standardgrey and cerebralmuseum. Curious fact: Buckminster Fuller was not the inventor of these structures. The first geodesic dome was built 30 years earlier “by  Walther Bauersfeld, chief engineer of the Carl Zeiss optical …read more

More Paul Rudolph houses – exteriors and interiors

Tuesday, May 26th, 2009

More houses by Paul Rudolph. I’m not sure why I like him so much; maybe it’s the feeling that every space is designed for a party, or the use of white, or that he went so glam/space age in the 60s and 70s. I like all the low Japanese-style seating, often set in one-step-deep conversation pits. Almost all his houses have this in common, whether they’re strict midcentury modern or …read more

Japanese interiors – updated traditional farmhouses

Thursday, April 2nd, 2009

The photo above shows the central living area of a rural farmhouse on the border of Tochigi and Ibaraki prefectures. The house was restored by Kenji Tsuchisawa who bought it as a rundown heap when he was only 20, after seeing a photograph of a traditional Japanese farmhouse on a Tokyo magazine cover. He bought the house before realizing it was situated just one village away from the house in …read more