Posts Tagged ‘ruins’

Montezuma Castle

Sunday, January 1st, 2012

This place is the inaccurately named “Montezuma Castle,” built circa 700 AD by the Sinagua people (also not the correct name – sin agua means without water and was the name given to them by the Spanish). It lies south of Sedona in Arizona. More on the site here.

…read more

Oldest temple in the world found in Turkey

Tuesday, February 23rd, 2010

The Göbekli Tepe temple near Şanlıurfa, Turkey, about 20 miles from the Syrian border and not far from Mesopotamia, was discovered by a Kurdish shepherd. It turns out to be 11,500 years old, many thousands of years older than any other known human temple building, and apparently it is radically altering archeology’s understanding of the origins of human civilization.

…read more

James Wines and SITE – art, architecture & enlightened business

Saturday, October 10th, 2009

Dear Vancouver architects and business owners, let’s re-visit the enlightened 1970s collaboration between the Best Products company, based in Virginia, and the artist-architect James Wines and his group SITE (Sculpture In The Environment). We could use some of their joint risk-taking and artistic innovation around here. What the videos below show evidence of, but don’t elaborate on, is the fact that the owners of the Best Products company were a highly educated, innovative, aesthetically adventurous family deeply interested in art.

…read more

One of these things is not like the other.

Saturday, October 10th, 2009

Things for your garden, from right to left: Roman column, menacing bird of prey statue fit for a military dictator, mass-produced standing stone with Chinese inscription, birdbath/fountain with peeing cupid and his parents, cartoon meteorite.

Acutally, this is neither a meteorite nor a fake. It’s a real, naturally occurring rock of some kind.

…read more

Archeotecture

Wednesday, May 20th, 2009

You could almost call these buildings archeotecture, or perhaps archeolitecture, because though all three were built recently, they look and feel profoundly archeological. All of them have the mute, mysterious quality of monumental ancient ruins and they produce – for me, anyway – that weird, quiet, prickling-the-back-of-the-neck sensation you sometimes get when viewing something impossibly old. 

…read more