Posts Tagged ‘science’

Hurricane

Thursday, November 8th, 2012

It looks as if we may have inadvertently designed this storm ourselves.

Animation by University of Delaware’s College of Earth, Ocean and Environment

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How rooms and architecture affect mood and creativity

Saturday, May 2nd, 2009

Jonas Salk claimed that it wasn’t until he left his basement lab in the States and went to clear his head in a monastery in Assisi that he was able to solve the puzzle of polio. He felt that Assisi’s colonnaded walks, serene architecture and hillside views had provided the right mental conditions for the necessary creative and intellectual leap.

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Happy Ada Lovelace Day!

Tuesday, March 24th, 2009

Ada Lovelace Day is an international blogging event instituted to draw attention to women who excel in the area of technology. Who is Ada Lovelace? From here:

Ada Lovelace was one of the world’s first computer programmers, and one of the first people to see computers as more than just a machine for doing sums.

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Building mimics DNA, petri dishes

Wednesday, January 14th, 2009

The new building for the BC Cancer Agency is a good addition to Broadway, one of Vancouver’s most ridiculously unattractive streets. The building’s most obvious feature is its round windows which are meant to reference the glass petri dishes used in cancer research. And they’re functional – you can actually open the window in your workspace and the glass ventilation shutters direct air flow.

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Cynthia Maxwell, cool science design nerd girl

Thursday, December 11th, 2008

Cynthia Maxwell, who is not only a mechanical engineer who has just finished a PhD on “Sound Synthesis from Shape-Changing Geometric Models” at Berkeley and has been part of the audio group at Apple and has worked for NASA, she also has a great eye and a sense of humour.

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Brainbows – neurons and pixels

Wednesday, October 8th, 2008

Somebody is bound to steal these digital images for textile design… Today’s announcement of the Nobel Prize for Chemistry honours the work of 3 scientists, 2 American and 1 Japanese, for their work in exploiting the luminosity of jellyfish for medical purposes. Using genes that produce luminescent proteins, they were able to tag cells in the body to aid in brain and cancer research. 

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