Posts Tagged ‘stone’

Most common building material in Goa is a stone called laterite

Tuesday, February 14th, 2012

What appear to be red bricks below (at left in the photo, and on the wall surrounding the yellow building) are in fact quarried blocks of laterite, a porous red stone common in India and other countries. In Goa the laterite blocks are usually grouted and then cemented or plastered over and painted.

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Taliesin West, Frank Lloyd Wright

Sunday, January 8th, 2012

Photography is only minimally allowed at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin West, his winter house in Arizona, so most of these photos are just exterior shots. It seems to be a form of sacrilege to admit to not being a fan of FLW’s work, but I’ve never been as impressed by him as others are and Taliesin West provided a good example of why.

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Living with boulders

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2009

Frank Lloyd Wright built Fallingwater on a boulder-covered site, but the giant rocks beneath and around that well-known house are not nearly so graphic or madly visible as they are in these houses. Some of these structures were deliberately built on or around boulders, whether for aesthetics, site preservation, or protection; others incorporated the rocks simply because the rocks could not be moved from the only available building spot.

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Archeotecture

Wednesday, May 20th, 2009

You could almost call these buildings archeotecture, or perhaps archeolitecture, because though all three were built recently, they look and feel profoundly archeological. All of them have the mute, mysterious quality of monumental ancient ruins and they produce – for me, anyway – that weird, quiet, prickling-the-back-of-the-neck sensation you sometimes get when viewing something impossibly old. 

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Depth in surfaces – Wang Shu’s Ningbo Museum

Monday, May 4th, 2009

Museum designed and built as if by archeological time. The Ningbo Historic Museum was designed by Wang Shu of Amateur Architecture Studio. Photos by Iwan Baan, via archdaily. I think of this as “archeotecture.”

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