Posts Tagged ‘weaving’

Navajo chief’s blanket ends up on Antiques Road Show (2004)

Friday, May 23rd, 2014

This is for those who haven’t seen this decade-old segment which for some reason has been making the social media rounds again.

It is so nice to see a truly beautiful textile get this sort of attention (and from men too, which speaking as a textiles person rarely happens in North America, in contrast with other parts of the world).

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Mick Jagger in Peru

Friday, May 16th, 2014

I was talking to the very knowledgeable owner of a shop of antique weaving in Cuzco, Peru, and after a while he mentioned that Mick Jagger had been in the shop two years before. When I asked if Jagger was in Peru to do a gig, he said no, he had come to see Machu Picchu.

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Arhuaca mochila bags of Colombia

Sunday, April 13th, 2014

I first noticed these cylindrical handwoven bags on a couple of delegates at the UN World Urban Forum in Medellín, Colombia. They looked unusually sturdy, very finely handwoven in wool, and all had unique and beautiful geometric patterns. A week later in Bogotá I realized they are actually quite common.

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Boredom is the dream bird that hatches the egg of experience

Friday, May 18th, 2012

“If sleep is the apogee of physical relaxation, boredom is the apogee of mental relaxation. Boredom is the dream bird that hatches the egg of experience. A rustling in the leaves drives him away. His nesting places—the activities that are intimately associated with boredom—are already extinct in the cities and are declining in the country as well.

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Japanese interiors – updated traditional farmhouses

Thursday, April 2nd, 2009

The photo above shows the central living area of a rural farmhouse on the border of Tochigi and Ibaraki prefectures. The house was restored by Kenji Tsuchisawa who bought it as a rundown heap when he was only 20, after seeing a photograph of a traditional Japanese farmhouse on a Tokyo magazine cover.

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Traditional Japanese scarecrows

Wednesday, April 1st, 2009

The bottom photo shows a functioning scarecrows made of indigo-dyed hemp. The original book caption reads “The bold design of this piece of shibori-dyed hemp by Seizo Ishikawa, a farmer, seems at home working as a scarecrow by a newly harvested rice field.” The birds in Japan must have been accustomed to seeing farmers in real Japanese indigo yukatas, waving their arms.

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